Snapped up: Wildlife ranger poses next to terrifying 13FT crocodile after snaring it in Australian harbour

By // Latest Additions | Snapped up: Wildlife ranger poses next to terrifying 13FT crocodile after snaring it in Australian harbour
Email to a friend Plain text Print version // Font size: Decrease font Enlarge font

By Simon Tomlinson

PUBLISHED: 10:49 EST, 5 February 2013 | UPDATED: 10:52 EST, 5 February 2013

A female wildlife ranger gives the thumbs-up after snaring a 13ft crocodile in an operation to keep the terrifying species away from humans.

The 2,000lb creature was pulled out of a trap in Darwin Harbour in Australia's Northern Territory before having its eyes covered with tape and its gigantic jaws bound firmly shut.

It was then strapped down to a trailer with cables and ropes before being moved as part of a relocation programme by the Northern Territory Parks and Wildlife Commission (NTPWC).

Thumbs-up: Northern Territory Parks and Wildlife ranger Dani Best smiles next to the 13ft saltwater crocodile that was pulled in from a trap in Darwin Harbour, Australia

Thumbs-up: Northern Territory Parks and Wildlife ranger Dani Best smiles next to the 13ft saltwater crocodile that was pulled in from a trap in Darwin Harbour, Australia

Going nowhere: The 2,000lb creature had its eyes covered and its gigantic jaws strapped firmly shut before being strapped to a trailer ready to be relocated to a sfer area

Going nowhere: The 2,000lb creature had its eyes covered and its gigantic jaws strapped firmly shut before being strapped to a trailer ready to be relocated to a sfer area

The number of saltwater crocodiles removed from waters in from the Top End area of north Australia reached record levels last year.

The NTPWC captured 314 over the 12-month period, including 215 from Darwin Harbour alone.

One of those included a 4.26m male which was caught in May, according to ABC Darwin.

Speaking when the figures were released in December, senior wildlife ranger Tom Nichols said it served as a reminder of the dangers that crocodiles pose to the public.

He said: 'This means behaving responsibly in and around Territory waters and not putting yourself or others at risk of crocodile attack.'

Safety first: The crocodile was moved as part of a programme by the Northern Territory Parks and Wildlife Commission to keep the species away from humans

Safety first: The crocodile was moved as part of a programme by the Northern Territory Parks and Wildlife Commission to keep the species away from humans

Growing danger: The number of saltwater crocodiles removed from waters from Darwin Harbour (above) and the Top End waters reached record levels last year

Growing danger: The number of saltwater crocodiles removed from waters from Darwin Harbour (above) and the Top End waters reached record levels last year

He said the management team had improved its success rate with the use of more traps and custom-fitted boats that include specifically fitted harpoon racks.

Last week, a crocodile was caught and killed after taking a nine-year-old boy near the community of Dhanyia, while he was swimming at Port Bradshaw, about 1,000km east of Darwin, on December 1.

According to ABC Darwin, police said family members tried to spear the crocodile, but the boy was dragged into deeper water.

The official search was suspended two weeks later, but others continue to hunt the creature.

It was finally tracked down and killed last week, although no human remains were found inside.

Tagged as:

Recent Nollywood Articles